Category: still life

Anne Vallayer-Coster (French, 1744 – 1818): Still life with Peaches and Grapes (c. 1779) (via National Gallery of Canada)

Jan Peeter van Bredael the Elder – Still Life of Flowers in a Park With a Woman – 

Jan Peeter van Bredael the Elder or Jan Pieter van Bredael the Elder (Antwerp, 23 April 1654 – Antwerp, 10 March 1745) was a Flemish painter, art restorer and art dealer. He is known for his still lifes of flowers and fruits, game and Italianate landscapes. He was a member of the prominent artistic family van Bredael from Antwerp.

Jan Peeter van Bredael the Elder was born into an artist family in Antwerp as a son of the landscape painter Peeter van Bredael and Anna Maria Veldener. His father was known for his in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes. His mother was the daughter of the sculptor Jennyn Veldener. His brothers Joris and Alexander also became painters.

His father was his first teacher. He left for Italy before 1680. Upon his return to Antwerp in 1680 he became a member of the Antwerp Guild of St Luke. He married on 11 January 1680 Joanna Pinseel. His first wife died in February 1687. He remarried the same year. He had seven daughters and four sons with his second wife Joanna Catharina Huybrechts. He travelled to London between 1685 and 1689. Here he was active as a painter, art dealer and art restorer.

Jan Gillis Ferdinandus van Raveschot was his pupil from 1694. He was successful and provided funds to the Guild of St Luke of Antwerp of which he became a dean In 1689. He was also active as an art restorer in Antwerp. In 1698 the Antwerp magistrate paid him for the restoration of some paintings. Between 1680 and 1729 he was a captain in the local civilian militia. He was financially successful and was able to purchase a house on the fashionable Meir in Antwerp. He moved to a hostel after his wife died in 1716.

He was recorded as an artist, art dealer and restorer in Paris in 1719.

He died on 10 March 1745 in Antwerp.

annarobertsstudio:

‘Thank You for Your Patronage’ – pastel on 100% cotton paper

For PLASTIC PAPER

Peeter Snyers – Still Life with Fruits – 

Oil on canvas. 23 7/8 x 20 in. (60.6 x 50.8 cm). North Carolina Museum of Art via Google Cultural Institute

Pieter Snyers or Peter Snijers (first name also written as: ‘Peeter’ and nickname ‘De Heilige’ or ‘The Holy One’) (30 March 1681 – 4 May 1752) was a Flemish art collector, painter, draughtsman and engraver. He practised a wide variety of genres, including portraits, genre painting, still life and landscape painting.

Peter Snyers – A vegetable still life with a red cabbage, together with caulifllower, beetroot and onions in a wicker basket – 

Pieter Snyers or Peter Snijers (first name also written as: ‘Peeter’ and nickname ‘De Heilige’ or ‘The Holy One’) (30 March 1681 – 4 May 1752) was a Flemish art collector, painter, draughtsman and engraver. He practised a wide variety of genres, including portraits, genre painting, still life and landscape painting.

Snyers was a versatile artist who painted in many genres including portraits, genre paintings, landscapes, still lifes, flower pieces, animal paintings, fruit pieces, game pieces, vegetable still lifes and plants. He painted both on large canvases and small copper plates. He was said never to have painted a composition twice.

Snyers painted a series of 12 paintings, each representing a different month of the year. This series is regarded as the masterpiece of the artist and never left his studio during his lifetime. The paintings were dispersed in 1763 when they were auctioned off. Two of the paintings (January and July) are now in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp and two (April and May) in the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium in Brussels. Another two, those for March and December, were auctioned by Christie’s (New York, 29 January 1998, lot 3). There is a reduced copy of the month of March in the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The paintings in the series are genre paintings which include a representation of each month by its astrological sign. The painting of the month of January in the Royal Museum of Fine Arts, Antwerp depicts three Epiphany singers with a big star and a few women and children with special cakes, particular to the winter season, together with a man pouring water who symbolises Aquarius, the astrological sign of January. The painting series may, directly or indirectly, have inspired Pieter Casteels III and Jacob van Huysum to produce a series of paintings of the 12 months.

His still lifes include outdoor settings with dead game and forest floors and indoor compositions with a profusion of small objects, fruits, single blossoms, nuts and other objects scattered across a surface.

Snyers was also an engraver. The British Museum holds a charming portrait of a sleeping boy by Snyers.[ He also produced an etched self-portrait (Rijksmuseum Amsterdam)

Peter Snijers – Still Life with Tistle and Nest – 

Pieter Snyers or Peter Snijers (first name also written as: ‘Peeter’ and nickname ‘De Heilige’ or ‘The Holy One’) (30 March 1681 – 4 May 1752) was a Flemish art collector, painter, draughtsman and engraver. He practised a wide variety of genres, including portraits, genre painting, still life and landscape painting.

He entered on 17 August 1741 into an agreement with five other artists to provide free tuition at the directors of the Antwerp Academy. The Academy would eventually replace the Guild of Saint Luke.

The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Dutch: Koninklijke Academie voor Schone Kunsten van Antwerpen) is an art academy located in Antwerp, Belgium. It is one of the oldest of its kind in Europe. It was founded in 1663 by David Teniers the Younger, painter to the Archduke Leopold Wilhelm and Don Juan of Austria. Teniers was master of the Guild of St Luke — which embraced arts and some handicrafts — and petitioned Philip IV of Spain, then master of the Spanish Netherlands, to grant a royal charter to establish a Fine Arts Academy in Antwerp. It houses the Antwerp Fashion Academy.

Shortly after the founding of Antwerp Academy, three large paintings were executed for its meeting hall. Antwerp, Nurse of Painters, by Theodoor Boeyermans (1665; 188 x 454 cm), promotes the city’s recent artistic past. Portraits of Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck watch over students as they practise the arts. At the centre is the allegorical Antverpia pictorum nutrix (“Antwerp, nurse of painters”). Chronos accompanies other young students who present their artwork. The river god Scaldis, a personification of Antwerp’s river Scheldt, symbolises with his cornucopia the wealth and bounty of the city’s artistic heritage.

The Guild of Saint Luke was the most common name for a city guild for painters and other artists in early modern Europe, especially in the Low Countries. They were named in honor of the Evangelist Luke, the patron saint of artists, who was identified by John of Damascus as having painted the Virgin’s portrait.

One of the most famous such organizations was founded in Antwerp. It continued to function until 1795, although by then it had lost its monopoly and therefore most of its power. In most cities, including Antwerp, the local government had given the Guild the power to regulate defined types of trade within the city. Guild membership, as a master, was therefore required for an artist to take on apprentices or to sell paintings to the public. Similar rules existed in Delft, where only members could sell paintings in the city or have a shop. The early guilds in Antwerp and Bruges, setting a model that would be followed in other cities, even had their own showroom or market stall from which members could sell their paintings directly to the public.

The guild of Saint Luke not only represented painters, sculptors, and other visual artists, but also—especially in the seventeenth century—dealers, amateurs, and even art lovers (the so-called liefhebbers). In the medieval period most members in most places were probably manuscript illuminators, where these were in the same guild as painters on wood and cloth—in many cities they were joined with the scribes or “scriveners”. In traditional guild structures, house-painters and decorators were often in the same guild. However, as artists formed under their own specific guild of St. Luke, particularly in the Netherlands, distinctions were increasingly made. In general, guilds also made judgments on disputes between artists and other artists or their clients. In such ways, it controlled the economic career of an artist working in a specific city, while in different cities they were wholly independent and often competitive against each other.

Peter Snijers – Still Life with Fruit and Flowers – 

Pieter Snyers or Peter Snijers (first name also written as: ‘Peeter’ and nickname ‘De Heilige’ or ‘The Holy One’) (30 March 1681 – 4 May 1752) was a Flemish art collector, painter, draughtsman and engraver. He practised a wide variety of genres, including portraits, genre painting, still life and landscape painting.

Peter Snijers – Still Life with Dead Game – 

Pieter Snyers or Peter Snijers (first name also written as: ‘Peeter’ and nickname ‘De Heilige’ or ‘The Holy One’) (30 March 1681 – 4 May 1752) was a Flemish art collector, painter, draughtsman and engraver. He practised a wide variety of genres, including portraits, genre painting, still life and landscape painting.

Pieter Casteels (III) – Dead Game and Flowers – 1708

Pieter Casteels III (1684–1749) was a Flemish painter and engraver mainly known for his flower pieces, game pieces and bird scenes. He spent a significant portion of his life in England where he had a varied career as a still life painter, printmaker and textile designer.

Peter Casteels (III) – Chrysanthemums, roses, tulips, orange blossom and other flowers in a bronze urn on a stone ledge – 1715

Pieter Casteels III (1684–1749) was a Flemish painter and engraver mainly known for his flower pieces, game pieces and bird scenes. He spent a significant portion of his life in England where he had a varied career as a still life painter, printmaker and textile designer.