Category: reblogs

oncanvas:

Deux femmes (Two women), Baya Mahieddine, 1947

gouache on board

24.75 x 18.88 in. (62.9 x 47.9 cm)

philamuseum:

Born in Havana, Cuba, Carmen Herrera moved between France and Cuba throughout the 1930s and 1940s, before settling in New York in 1954, where she continues to live and work. “Beacon II” displays her immense skill at creating striking compositions through the calculated use of contrasting colors and shapes. Bright red triangles cut across the canvas horizontally and vertically, creating an expansive horizon line that recalls a burst of light. 

 “Beacon II,” 2016, by Carmen Herrera (Promised gift of Glenn and Amanda Fuhrman)

publicdomainreview:

A few plates from Les Jeux et Plaisirs de l’Enfance (1657) – translating as “The games and pleasures of childhood” – a series of fifty engravings depicting children playing various games. Many of the games depicted are familiar to us today, such as tennis, darts, and “blind man’s buff”, but many are more unusual. One titled “Le jeu de pet en gueule” (literally translating as “The game of fart in the face”) seems to involve just what it says on the tin, in addition to some secondary racing element. Another simply titled “Bataille” (battle) seems to be akin to one massive free-for-all punch-up.⠀

The images were made by the French female engraver Claudine Bouzonnet-Stella (1636-1697) after initial studies by her uncle Jacques Stella (1596-1657), whom she studied under and whose workshop she came to work for along with her two sisters and her brother. After the death of her uncle in 1657, Claudine took charge of the workshop at the age of twenty-one, receiving exclusive rights to publish prints based on her uncle’s designs. The same year saw the publication of Les Jeux et Plaisirs de l’Enfance.⠀

More over on our site – just click link in bio and search “childhood"⠀
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#games #childhood #blindmansbuff #fart #punchup #fighting #game #illustration #playing
https://www.instagram.com/p/B3XWb5nnxXD/?igshid=ffzn5pfrngz6

oncanvas:

Newton Ferrers, Louise Thomas, 2008

oil on canvas
38 x 48 in. (96.52 x 121.92 cm)

oncanvas:

By the Riverbank, Dorothea Sharp, 1900s

oil on canvas

oncanvas:

White Cat, Gertrude Abercrombie, circa 1935-1938

oil on canvas
36 x 30 1/8 in. (91.5 x 76.5 cm)
Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, USA

brooklynmuseum:

Justice is here! This portrait of the Honorable Ruth Bader Ginsburg came into the Museum’s collection this year as a gift from the sitter herself. In the painting, Ginsburg appears with a calm yet determined gaze—perhaps a reflection of her stalwart position supporting gender equality, reproductive justice, and LGBTQ+ rights. Displayed in the institution that Ginsburg used to frequent as a child, this work celebrates her prominence as a Brooklyn native, iconic American figure, and integral voice on the nation’s highest court.⁠ 

See it now on view in our fifth floor American art galleries.

Constance P. Beaty (American). Large Oil Sketch: Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, circa 2015-2016. Oil on linen. Brooklyn Museum, Gift of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, 2019.2⁠⠀

thunderstruck9:

Tanya Poole (South African, b. 1971), The Garden of Nurtured Harmony, 2017. Oil on canvas, 180 x 120 cm.

via ochyming

oncanvas:

Mother with a Child, Nirit Takele, 2018

Acrylic on canvas
70 x 55 cm (27.56 x 21.65 in.)
Addis Fine Art, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

oncanvas:

Humayun’s Mosque, Agra, Mary Fedden, 1968

oil on canvas
30 x 36 in. (75.8 x 91.5 cm)