Category: netherlands

Louis Artan de Saint Martin – The North Sea at…

Louis Artan de Saint Martin – The North Sea at Blankenberge – 1871

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

He became one of the sixteen co-founders the Société Libre des Beaux-Arts, an association opposed to the stylistic hegemony of the academies and salons.

The Société Libre des Beaux-Arts (“Free Society of Fine Arts”) was an organization formed in 1868 by Belgian artists to react against academicism and to advance Realist painting and artistic freedom. Based in Brussels, the society was active until 1876, by which time the aesthetic values it espoused had infiltrated the official Salon. It played a formative role in establishing avant-gardism in Belgium.

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The Members of the Société Libre des Beaux-Arts by Edmond Lambrichs : from left to right, sitting are Huberti, Boudin, Degroux, Van Camp, Bouré, Verwée, C. Meunier, Dubois (holding copies of L’Art libre and L’Art Universel); standing, Lambrichs, Artan, Rops, Raeymaeckers, J.B. Meunier, Smits, Baron, De la Charlerie

Edmond Alphonse Charles Lambrichs – Portrait of members of the Société libre des Beaux-Arts – 1868

The first exhibition of the Free Society was held in 1868 to provide an alternative art space beyond the Salon. Three exhibitions were held in 1872. The society’s manifesto was written by Camille van Camp (nl) and published 31 January 1869. It promoted the “free and individual interpretation of nature” characteristic of Realist art, along with avant-garde concepts such as “struggle, change, freedom, progress, originality and tolerance.”

The society published the periodicals L’Art Libre, a bi-monthly review (1871–72), and L’Art Universel (1873–76). In the first issue of L’Art Libre, they collectively asserted:

“ Artistic independence must be spawned by force. It is our desire that art be free. The art of our time must return to man and nature. ”
The goals of the Free Society were influenced by aesthetic ideals set forth by Gustave Courbet and the Barbizon artists and by the poet Charles Baudelaire. “Modernity” and “sincerity” were keywords. Official cultural critics were at first openly hostile. Two early champions, however, were the critics Camille Lemonnier, a member, who urged that they should “be of their own time,” and Théo Hannon (1851-1916), who saw them as rebels against artificiality.

A group portrait by society member Edmond Lambrichs shows the 16 artists of the original organizing committee. The society attracted in particular landscape painters working at the Atelier Saint-Luc of Brussels, also known as the Académie de Saint-Luc (ca. 1846–1864). Louis Dubois, Félicien Rops, Constantin Meunier and Louis Artan de Saint-Martin are considered leading members. Most of the society’s members had also belonged to the Artistic and Literary Circle of Brussels and the Royal Belgian Society of Watercolorists.[ After the society dissolved, several members joined groups such as La Chrysalide and Les XX.

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20…

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

He came from a noble family. His father was an army officer who served as an adjutant to Prince Frederick. In 1842, his family moved to Ixelles and acquired Belgian citizenship, but his father died later that same year, so they moved to Brussels.

He began training for a military career, but quit when he was twenty and spent the next six years travelling through the Ardennes, making nature studies. During this time, he became friends with Edouard Delvaux and, after 1858, began visiting Paris, where he was influenced by the Barbizon school and the French marine painter, Eugène Boudin. Although he took some lessons from Delvaux, he remained largely self-taught.

He returned to Belgium in 1860, married the following year, and settled in Ixelles. There, he was further influenced by the landscape painter Hippolyte Boulenger, who took him on a tour of the Sonian Forest in Tervuren. In 1864, an economic depression resulted in the loss of his family fortune and he had to depend entirely upon painting for his income.

Despite this, he remained restless and spent the years 1867-1868 exploring Brittany and the shores of the English Channel. When he returned home, he became one of the sixteen co-founders the Société Libre des Beaux-Arts, an association opposed to the stylistic hegemony of the academies and salons.

From 1873 to 1874, he lived in Antwerp, where he joined with a group of progressive painters who were fighting the influence of the Academy of Fine Arts. In 1875, he shared a studio with Félicien Rops in Paris, then settled briefly in Berck-sur-Mer, where he created some of his best-known works. After 1880, he worked in a more impressionistic style. In 1881, he became a Knight in the Order of Leopold. Two years later, he was awarded a gold medal at the International Colonial and Export Exhibition in Amsterdam.

He spent his last years living in De Panne and died nearby in Nieuwpoort, of influenza, at the age of fifty-three. His tombstone was designed by Victor Horta.

Louis Artan – Seascape – 

Louis Artan – Seascape – 

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

Louis Artan – Nortsea with ships and dunes – 

Louis Artan – Nortsea with ships and dunes – 

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

Louis Artan – Fisher ships at sea – 

Louis Artan – Fisher ships at sea – 

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

Louis Artan – Seascape, ships on sea –

Louis Artan – Seascape, ships on sea

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

Louis Artan – The breeze – 1869

Louis Artan – The breeze – 1869

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

scribe4haxan:L’ Epave (1871) – Louis Artan de …

scribe4haxan:

L’ Epave (1871) – Louis Artan de Saint Martin

The Wreck

Louis Victor Antonio Artan de Saint-Martin (20 April 1837, The Hague – 23 May 1890, Nieuwpoort) was a Dutch-Belgian painter and etcher who specialized in seascapes.

Gijs Bosch Reitz – Garden of Versailles – 

Gijs Bosch Reitz – Garden of Versailles – 

Sigisbert Chrétien Bosch Reitz, known as Gijs (1860-1938) was a Dutch painter in the Impressionist and Symbolist styles. He was also associated with the Laren School.

Photograph of Gijs Bosch Reitz

Photograph of Gijs Bosch Reitz

Sigisbert Chrétien Bosch Reitz, known as Gijs (1860-1938) was a Dutch painter in the Impressionist and Symbolist styles. He was also associated with the Laren School.

He was born to a wealthy family and began his working career as a merchant. At the age of twenty-three, he decided to become an artist instead. After briefly attending the Quellinusschool, in Amsterdam, he went to Munich, where he took various drawing and painting courses, then finished his training at the Académie Julian in Paris, under the direction of William-Adolphe Bouguereau.

Upon his return, he settled in Katwijk aan Zee, but left after a short time to participate in the Exposition Universelle (1889), then went to England, where he lived in Runswick Bay and St. Ives before returning to Amsterdam.

He could not settle down, however, moving to Het Gooi in 1892, first in Eemnes, then Laren. Between each move, he travelled; to France, the United States and Japan, where he made a detailed study of Japanese art. This won him an international reputation and, from 1915 to 1927, he was a consultant on “Far Eastern Art” for the Metropolitan Museum in New York. He also managed a collection of Chinese porcelain at the Louvre.

He produced relatively few paintings because he worked slowly, paid great attention to detail and often strove hard to achieve a tapestry-like effect. Even his simplest, decorative-style works were the result of lengthy, concentrated effort. Richard Roland Holst  and Ferdinand Hart Nibbrig were good friends, but he generally remained aloof from the other artists at Laren and their social or professional affairs.

He died in an accident involving one of the steam-powered trolleys that ran between Laren and Amsterdam; known as the “Gooische Moordenaar” (The Killers of Gooi) due to the number of fatal accidents they caused.