Category: golden age

François Verwilt – The adoration of the sheper…

François Verwilt – The adoration of the sheperds

Francois (Frans) Verwilt (c.1623 in Rotterdam – 8 August 1691 in Rotterdam) was as a Dutch Golden Age landscape painter.

He was the son of the painter Adriaan Verwilt of Antwerp and was apprenticed to Cornelius van Poelenburgh (1586–1667) in Utrecht together with Jan van der Lijs, among others. He is considered part of the “Poelenburch landscape school”. According to Houbraken, who mentioned him as a pupil of Van Poelenburch, he painted the flesh tones of his figures in the manner of another Poelenburch pupil from The Hague, Daniel Vertangen. Houbraken commented however that Joachim von Sandrart claimed he had been a pupil of Kornelio van Bojo Leubourys. Cornelis de Bie wrote a poem about his figures drawn in the manner of Poelenburch that tempted Princes, Kings, and Dukes.

According to the RKD he lived mostly in Rotterdam, but is registered in Zeeland, where he worked in Vlissingen, Middelburg, and Veere. He became a member of the Guild of St. Luke in Middelburg in 1661, and became a member of the Veere guild in 1667, probably to sell paintings in those towns. Most of the pieces currently attributed to him are portraits and genre works, including village scenes of daily life.

Verwilt became a versatile painter in many genres including historical, mythical and biblical landscapes, genre works, portrait, still life and contemporary interiors of farming and urban middle class life. His colors range from the style of Poelenburgh in his landscapes to the chiaroscuro of Rembrandt in depictions of Dutch contemporary life.

His paintings are represented in many museums, including museums in Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Haarlem, Budapest, Leningrad, Mainz, Osnabrück, Paris, Vienna and elsewhere. There are no biographies or monographs of his works.

Verwilt lived most of his life in Rotterdam and his pupils were Cornelis Cingelaar and Pieter Hovius. He died in 1691 in Rotterdam.

François Verwilt – Jupiter and Antiope –

François Verwilt – Jupiter and Antiope –

Jupiter and Antiope is a frequent theme in western painting and has been treated by Titian, Van Dyck, Watteau and David among others.

They are based on the story of the seduction of Antiope by the god Zeus in Greek mythology, later imported into Roman mythology and told of the god Jupiter. According to this myth, Antiope, the beautiful daughter of King Nycteus of Thebes, was surprised and seduced by Zeus in the form of a satyr. She became pregnant and bore the twins Amphion and Zethus, who later killed Nycteus’ brother Lycus in revenge for his treatment of Antiope and took over the city of Thebes.

Satyrs and nymphs form two extremes in Greek mythology, which are united only by their instinctive natures. While the nymph was the source of the psychological term nymphomania (now hypersexuality), the satyr was the source of the once common but now outdated term satyriasis and can be understood as the nymph’s male equivalent.

Accordingly, both nymphs and satyrs are very regularly depicted in mythology – and thence also in their subsequent artistic reception – in erotic contexts and are accordingly favoured topics of art. In addition there is a clear aesthetic contrast between the two stereotypes. The nymph is in general very beautiful and physically perfect. They were mostly depicted with ivory, light and very delicate colours and an idealised female form, having close similarities with depictions of Venus. On the other hand, the satyrs, who are the followers of Bacchus, are very ugly, with the horns, legs and sometimes the tail of a goat. They are also strong, muscular, and tanned. Thus nymphs and satyrs present an optical contrast, which could hardly be any stronger and which makes them a perfect pair for artistic purposes.

Francois (Frans) Verwilt (c.1623 in Rotterdam – 8 August 1691 in Rotterdam) was as a Dutch Golden Age painter.

rijksmuseum-art: A Man Dancing with a Dog by F…

rijksmuseum-art:

A Man Dancing with a Dog by François Verwilt, Museum of the Netherlands

Een man met een baard dansend met een hond.

Francois (Frans) Verwilt (c.1623 in Rotterdam – 8 August 1691 in Rotterdam) was as a Dutch Golden Age painter.

rijksmuseum-art: Portrait of a Boy, called The…

rijksmuseum-art:

Portrait of a Boy, called The Young Son of Admiral van Nes (The Admiral’s Son) by François Verwilt, 1669, Museum of the Netherlands

Portret van een jongen, bekend onder de titel ‘Het zoontje van admiraal van Nes’. Staande jongen, ten voeten uit, die met hoed in de rechterhand en handschoenen en stok in de linkerhand een buiging maakt.

Francois (Frans) Verwilt (c.1623 in Rotterdam – 8 August 1691 in Rotterdam) was as a Dutch Golden Age landscape painter.

Peeter van Bredael – Market with the Ponte San…

Peeter van Bredael – Market with the Ponte Sant’Angelo in Rome – 

Ponte Sant’Angelo, once the Aelian Bridge or Pons Aelius, meaning the Bridge of Hadrian, is a Roman bridge in Rome, Italy, completed in 134 AD by Roman Emperor Hadrian, to span the Tiber, from the city center to his newly constructed mausoleum, now the towering Castel Sant’Angelo. The bridge is faced with travertine marble and spans the Tiber with five arches, three of which are Roman; it was approached by means of ramp from the river. The bridge is now solely pedestrian, and provides a scenic view of Castel Sant’Angelo. It links the rioni of Ponte (which was named after the bridge itself), and Borgo, to whom the bridge administratively belongs.

The Mausoleum of Hadrian, usually known as Castel Sant’Angelo (English: Castle of the Holy Angel), is a towering cylindrical building in Parco Adriano, Rome, Italy. It was initially commissioned by the Roman Emperor Hadrian as a mausoleum for himself and his family. The building was later used by the popes as a fortress and castle, and is now a museum. The structure was once the tallest building in Rome.

Pieter van Bredael or Peeter van Bredael (1629–1719) was a Flemish painter specializing in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes or contemporary, usually, urban environments.

Peeter van Bredael – A Market In Italy –

Peeter van Bredael – A Market In Italy

Pieter van Bredael or Peeter van Bredael (1629–1719) was a Flemish painter specializing in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes or contemporary, usually, urban environments.

Pieter van Bredael is mainly known for his scenes of Roman cattle markets amidst a landscape of buildings, often ruins from Antiquity, Italian pastoral landscapes and less often battle pieces. He also depicted genre scenes such as village festivals, processions and a commedia del’arte scene. Van Bredael’s very imaginative market scenes succeeded in illustrating various aspects of everyday town life. Van Bredael was often influenced by Italian architectural forms.

He worked as a copyist and is known to have copied battle scenes of the Dutch painter Philips Wouwerman. A drawing of an Equestrian Battle in the Mauritshuis has been attributed to van Bredael as being a copy after Wouwerman.

Peeter van Bredael – The Old Ox Market in Antw…

Peeter van Bredael – The Old Ox Market in Antwerp – 

Pieter van Bredael or Peeter van Bredael (1629–1719) was a Flemish painter specializing in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes or contemporary, usually, urban environments.

Pieter van Bredael was born in Antwerp in 1629 and was baptised on 19 July 1629 as the son of Peter and Maria Pais. He reportedly joined the workshop of David Ryckaert III on 20 January 1640 and studied there for four years. He undertook several travels abroad. It is known he travelled to Spain. Although there is no evidence for a stay in Italy, the inclusion in his landscapes of ruins of architecture from the environs of Rome points to a possible visit to Italy.

Upon his return to Antwerp in 1648 he married Anna Maria Veldener, the daughter of the prominent sculptor Jenijn Veldener. The couple had eight children of whom three, Jan Peeter, Alexander and Joris became painters. Several of his grand-children such as Joseph van Bredael, Jan Pieter van Bredael the Younger and Jan Frans van Bredael were also painters.

Van Bredael likely did not start working for his own account until 1651, the year in which he became a master of the Antwerp Guild of Saint Luke. He also joined a schutterij, a local civil militia, and obtained the rank of captain.

His pupils included his sons Jan Peeter, Joris and Alexander, Hendrik Frans van Lint and Ferdinandus Hofmans.

He died in Antwerp where he was buried on 9 March 1719.

Peeter van Bredael – Market scene in an italia…

Peeter van Bredael – Market scene in an italianete landscape – 1668

Pieter van Bredael or Peeter van Bredael (1629–1719) was a Flemish painter specializing in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes or contemporary, usually, urban environments.

Peeter van Bredael – Market sene in an italian…

Peeter van Bredael – Market sene in an italianete landscape – 1680

Pieter van Bredael or Peeter van Bredael (1629–1719) was a Flemish painter specializing in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes or contemporary, usually, urban environments.

Peeter van Bredael – Market scene in an italia…

Peeter van Bredael – Market scene in an italianeted landscape – 1680

Pieter van Bredael or Peeter van Bredael (1629–1719) was a Flemish painter specializing in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes or contemporary, usually, urban environments.