Category: flowers

Jan Peeter van Bredael the Elder – Still Life of Flowers in a Park With a Woman – 

Jan Peeter van Bredael the Elder or Jan Pieter van Bredael the Elder (Antwerp, 23 April 1654 – Antwerp, 10 March 1745) was a Flemish painter, art restorer and art dealer. He is known for his still lifes of flowers and fruits, game and Italianate landscapes. He was a member of the prominent artistic family van Bredael from Antwerp.

Jan Peeter van Bredael the Elder was born into an artist family in Antwerp as a son of the landscape painter Peeter van Bredael and Anna Maria Veldener. His father was known for his in market scenes and village feasts set in Italianate landscapes. His mother was the daughter of the sculptor Jennyn Veldener. His brothers Joris and Alexander also became painters.

His father was his first teacher. He left for Italy before 1680. Upon his return to Antwerp in 1680 he became a member of the Antwerp Guild of St Luke. He married on 11 January 1680 Joanna Pinseel. His first wife died in February 1687. He remarried the same year. He had seven daughters and four sons with his second wife Joanna Catharina Huybrechts. He travelled to London between 1685 and 1689. Here he was active as a painter, art dealer and art restorer.

Jan Gillis Ferdinandus van Raveschot was his pupil from 1694. He was successful and provided funds to the Guild of St Luke of Antwerp of which he became a dean In 1689. He was also active as an art restorer in Antwerp. In 1698 the Antwerp magistrate paid him for the restoration of some paintings. Between 1680 and 1729 he was a captain in the local civilian militia. He was financially successful and was able to purchase a house on the fashionable Meir in Antwerp. He moved to a hostel after his wife died in 1716.

He was recorded as an artist, art dealer and restorer in Paris in 1719.

He died on 10 March 1745 in Antwerp.

sfmoma:

Zita David, Path, gouache on paper, 70×78 cm, 2018

Peter Snijers – Still Life with Tistle and Nest – 

Pieter Snyers or Peter Snijers (first name also written as: ‘Peeter’ and nickname ‘De Heilige’ or ‘The Holy One’) (30 March 1681 – 4 May 1752) was a Flemish art collector, painter, draughtsman and engraver. He practised a wide variety of genres, including portraits, genre painting, still life and landscape painting.

He entered on 17 August 1741 into an agreement with five other artists to provide free tuition at the directors of the Antwerp Academy. The Academy would eventually replace the Guild of Saint Luke.

The Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp (Dutch: Koninklijke Academie voor Schone Kunsten van Antwerpen) is an art academy located in Antwerp, Belgium. It is one of the oldest of its kind in Europe. It was founded in 1663 by David Teniers the Younger, painter to the Archduke Leopold Wilhelm and Don Juan of Austria. Teniers was master of the Guild of St Luke — which embraced arts and some handicrafts — and petitioned Philip IV of Spain, then master of the Spanish Netherlands, to grant a royal charter to establish a Fine Arts Academy in Antwerp. It houses the Antwerp Fashion Academy.

Shortly after the founding of Antwerp Academy, three large paintings were executed for its meeting hall. Antwerp, Nurse of Painters, by Theodoor Boeyermans (1665; 188 x 454 cm), promotes the city’s recent artistic past. Portraits of Peter Paul Rubens and Anthony van Dyck watch over students as they practise the arts. At the centre is the allegorical Antverpia pictorum nutrix (“Antwerp, nurse of painters”). Chronos accompanies other young students who present their artwork. The river god Scaldis, a personification of Antwerp’s river Scheldt, symbolises with his cornucopia the wealth and bounty of the city’s artistic heritage.

The Guild of Saint Luke was the most common name for a city guild for painters and other artists in early modern Europe, especially in the Low Countries. They were named in honor of the Evangelist Luke, the patron saint of artists, who was identified by John of Damascus as having painted the Virgin’s portrait.

One of the most famous such organizations was founded in Antwerp. It continued to function until 1795, although by then it had lost its monopoly and therefore most of its power. In most cities, including Antwerp, the local government had given the Guild the power to regulate defined types of trade within the city. Guild membership, as a master, was therefore required for an artist to take on apprentices or to sell paintings to the public. Similar rules existed in Delft, where only members could sell paintings in the city or have a shop. The early guilds in Antwerp and Bruges, setting a model that would be followed in other cities, even had their own showroom or market stall from which members could sell their paintings directly to the public.

The guild of Saint Luke not only represented painters, sculptors, and other visual artists, but also—especially in the seventeenth century—dealers, amateurs, and even art lovers (the so-called liefhebbers). In the medieval period most members in most places were probably manuscript illuminators, where these were in the same guild as painters on wood and cloth—in many cities they were joined with the scribes or “scriveners”. In traditional guild structures, house-painters and decorators were often in the same guild. However, as artists formed under their own specific guild of St. Luke, particularly in the Netherlands, distinctions were increasingly made. In general, guilds also made judgments on disputes between artists and other artists or their clients. In such ways, it controlled the economic career of an artist working in a specific city, while in different cities they were wholly independent and often competitive against each other.

Peter Snijers – Still Life with Fruit and Flowers – 

Pieter Snyers or Peter Snijers (first name also written as: ‘Peeter’ and nickname ‘De Heilige’ or ‘The Holy One’) (30 March 1681 – 4 May 1752) was a Flemish art collector, painter, draughtsman and engraver. He practised a wide variety of genres, including portraits, genre painting, still life and landscape painting.

Marian Ellis Rowan (Australian, 1848 – 1922): Untitled (Flowering Cordylines) (via Bonhams)

Peter Casteels (III) – Chrysanthemums, roses, tulips, orange blossom and other flowers in a bronze urn on a stone ledge – 1715

Pieter Casteels III (1684–1749) was a Flemish painter and engraver mainly known for his flower pieces, game pieces and bird scenes. He spent a significant portion of his life in England where he had a varied career as a still life painter, printmaker and textile designer.

Pieter Casteels III – Basket of flowers on a table – 

Pieter Casteels III (1684–1749) was a Flemish painter and engraver mainly known for his flower pieces, game pieces and bird scenes. He spent a significant portion of his life in England where he had a varied career as a still life painter, printmaker and textile designer.

Casteels painted flowers, flower pieces, landscapes, bird scenes, game pieces and occasional portraits. He is often confused with Peter Frans Casteels, a still life painter active in Antwerp in the late 17th century. Some of his animal scenes show similarity with the style of Dutch master Melchior d’Hondecoeter and in some cases experts have been unable to determine whether to attribute a particular work to either master. As he spent most of his active career in England, a large portion of his work is in public and private collections in the UK.

When in 1726 Casteels embarked on his first publishing venture, the production of 12 plates of bird scenes, he had not previously made any etchings except for two or three little plates as trials. The birds were depicted against gardens with classical decoration as background settings. The British Museum has a complete set of the original prints in its collection.

It is possible that the direct or indirect inspiration for the series of paintings on the 12 months made by Casteels was a series of the 12 months by the Antwerp painter Pieter Snyers. The 12 paintings by Casteels were engraved by Henry Fletcher and published by Robert Furber, a British horticulturist, under the title the Twelve Months of Flowers in 1730. The prints illustrate seasonal flowers that could be ordered from Furber and are thus the first illustrated nursery catalogue published in England. Each plant is numbered, with a list of the corresponding species names provided. More than 400 different species of plant are featured. For clear identification each flower is depicted facing to the front and is arranged separately.

The plates were originally sold on a subscription basis for £1 5s in uncolored form, or £2 12s 6d for a colored version. The subscribers included members of the aristrocracy. Casteels, Furber and Fletcher had each invested £500 in the publishing venture. As they were able to find 457 subscribers, they each made a handsome profit even before the sale of the prints, the plants or the original paintings. A second edition was published in 1734, which included “The Flower-Garden for Gentlemen and Ladies” not present in the first edition of 1730. The plates of the later edition were engraved by Peter Smith and are reductions of the originals. The book was reprinted in 1982. The complete set of the 12 original paintings, which Casteels made for the series, were sold by Christie’s on 25 May 2005 in New York as lot 1529. The set of paintings and engravings inspired Jacob van Huysum, who had recently moved to London from Amsterdam, to paint his own set of Twelve Months of Flowers (Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge) between 1732–6.

Furber published the Twelve Months of Fruit in 1732. Like the earlier publication on flowers, the Twelve Months of Fruit features 12 full-color plates, this time depicting 364 different fruit. Each plate focuses on one month and shows the varieties of fruit that ripen during that month.

Pieter Casteels III – Melons, grapes and peaches before a stone ledge and a bronze urn filled with chrysanthemums, roses, tulips and other flowers – 

Pieter Casteels III (1684–1749) was a Flemish painter and engraver mainly known for his flower pieces, game pieces and bird scenes. He spent a significant portion of his life in England where he had a varied career as a still life painter, printmaker and textile designer.

Pieter Casteels III was born in Antwerp as the son of Elisabeth Bosschaert and Pieter Casteels II, a painter of landscapes and history paintings. He trained with his father. In 1708 he left with his brother-in-law Peter Tillemans to England to work for a picture dealer named Turner for whom they made copies of Old Master paintings. Casteels became an active participant in London’s artistic community, subscribing to the Kneller Academy of Painting and Drawing in 1711 and becoming a member of the Rose and Crown Club. He returned briefly to Antwerp in 1712 where he became a member of the local Guild of Saint Luke in the same year.

Casteels settled permanently in England around 1717. He developed a successful practice as a painter of flowers and exotic birds that chiefly served a decorative purpose as overdoors and chimney-pieces. He worked simultaneously as an art dealer and imported paintings from Europe. His customers included James Stanley, 10th Earl of Derby who bought imported art as well as original work of Casteels.

In 1726 Casteels launched a subscription for a set of 12 prints of birds, which he had etched after his own designs. The success of this project encouraged him to work on two further publications: the Twelve Months of Flowers and the Twelve Months of Fruit.

Casteels advertised the usefulness of the illustrations in these publications as patterns for workers in luxury industries. Casteels was thus able to demonstrate his potential as a textile designer. In May 1735 he retired from painting and spent his last fourteen years working for a calico manufacturer as a residential artist, first at Martin Abbey near Tooting, Surrey, and later, briefly, in Richmond, London.

He died on 16 May 1749 in Richmond after a long illness.

Pieter Casteels III – A basket of tulips, roses, poppies and other flowers on a stone ledge with peaches and grapes in the foreground – 

Pieter Casteels III (1684–1749) was a Flemish painter and engraver mainly known for his flower pieces, game pieces and bird scenes. He spent a significant portion of his life in England where he had a varied career as a still life painter, printmaker and textile designer.

lunasong365:

November flowers. Coloured engraving of water-colour drawing by Pieter Casteels for Robert Furber, Twelve Months of Flowers (1730). Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA

Pieter Casteels III (1684–1749) was a Flemish painter and engraver mainly known for his flower pieces, game pieces and bird scenes. He spent a significant portion of his life in England where he had a varied career as a still life painter, printmaker and textile designer.

In 1726 Casteels launched a subscription for a set of 12 prints of birds, which he had etched after his own designs. The success of this project encouraged him to work on two further publications: the Twelve Months of Flowers and the Twelve Months of Fruit.

Casteels advertised the usefulness of the illustrations in these publications as patterns for workers in luxury industries.