Category: biblical

koredzas:Gerard David (1450 – 1523) – The Cruc…

koredzas:

Gerard David (1450 – 1523) – The Crucifixion

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

drakontomalloi:Gerard David – Altarpiece of St…

drakontomalloi:

Gerard David – Altarpiece of St. Michael, central panel. 1510

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

At the time of David’s death, the glory of Bruges and its painters was on the wane: Antwerp had become the leader in art as well as in political and commercial importance. Of David’s pupils in Bruges, only Isenbrant, Albert Cornelis and Ambrosius Benson achieved importance. Among other Flemish painters, Joachim Patinir and Jan Mabuse were to some degree influenced by him.

lionofchaeronea:The Nativity, Gerard David, ca…

lionofchaeronea:

The Nativity, Gerard David, ca. 1490

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

The works for which David is best known are the altarpieces painted before his visit to Antwerp: the Marriage of St Catherine at the National Gallery, London; the triptych of the Madonna Enthroned and Saints of the Brignole-Sale collection in Genoa; the Annunciation of the Sigmaringen collection; and above all, the Madonna with Angels and Saints (usually titled The Virgin among the Virgins), which he donated to the Carmelite Nuns of Sion at Bruges, and which is now in the Rouen museum.

Only a few of his works have remained in Bruges: The Judgment of Cambyses, The Flaying of Sisamnes and the Baptism of Christ in the Groeningemuseum, and the Transfiguration in the Church of Our Lady.

The rest were scattered around the world, and to this may be due the oblivion into which his very name had fallen; this, and the fact that, some believed that for all the beauty and the soulfulness of his work, he had nothing innovative to add to the history of art.

Even in his best work he had only given newer variations of the art of his predecessors and contemporaries. His rank among the masters was renewed, however, when a number of his paintings were assembled at the seminal 1902 Gruuthusemuseum, Bruges exhibition of early Flemish painters.

He also worked closely with the leading manuscript illuminators of the day, and seems to have been brought in to paint specific important miniatures himself, among them a Virgin among the Virgins in the Morgan Library, a Virgin and Child on a Crescent Moon in the Rothschild Prayerbook, and a portrait of the Emperor Maximilian in Vienna. Several of his drawings also survive, and elements from these appear in the works of other painters and illuminators for several decades after his death.

classic-art: Three Legends of Saint Nicholas G…

classic-art:

Three Legends of Saint Nicholas

Gheeraert David, c. 1500-1520

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

He was born in Oudewater, now located in the province of Utrecht. His year of birth is approximated as c. 1460 on the basis that he looks to be around 50 years in the 1509 self-portrait found in his Virgin among the Virgins. He spent his mature career in Bruges, where he was a member of the painters’ guild. Upon the death of Hans Memling in 1494, David became Bruges’ leading painter. He moved to Bruges in 1483, presumably from Haarlem, where he had formed his early style under Albert van Oudewater, and joined the Guild of Saint Luke at Bruges in 1484. He became dean of the guild in 1501, and in 1496 married Cornelia Cnoop, daughter of the dean of the goldsmiths’ guild. David was one of the town’s leading citizens.

Ambrosius Benson served his apprenticeship with David, but they came into dispute around 1519 over a number of paintings and drawings Benson had collected from other artists. Because of a large debt owed to him by Benson, David had refused to return the material. Benson pursued the matter legally and won, leading to David serving time in prison.

He died on 13 August 1523 and was buried in the Church of Our Lady at Bruges.

David had been completely forgotten when in the early 1860s he was rescued from oblivion by William Henry James Weale, whose researches in the archives of Bruges brought to light the main facts of the painter’s life and led to the reconstruction of David’s artistic personality, beginning with the recognition of David’s only documented work, the Virgin Among Virgins at Rouen.

history-of-fashion:ab. 1509 Gérard David – The…

history-of-fashion:

ab. 1509 Gérard David – The Virgin among the Virgins

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

lionofchaeronea:Transfiguration of Christ, Ger…

lionofchaeronea:

Transfiguration of Christ, Gerard David, by 1523

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

medievalautumn: The Annunciation by Gerard D…

medievalautumn:

The Annunciation by

Gerard David

(1506, Oil on wood, 79 x 64 cm)

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

oldpaintings:The Marriage at Cana by Gerard Da…

oldpaintings:

The Marriage at Cana by Gerard David (Flemish, c.1450-60–1523)

The transformation of water into wine at the Marriage at Cana or Wedding at Cana is the first miracle attributed to Jesus in the Gospel of John. In the Gospel account, Jesus, his mother and his disciples are invited to a wedding, and when the wine runs out, Jesus delivers a sign of his glory by turning water into wine.

The location of Cana has been subject to the debate of Christ among biblical scholars and archeologists; several villages in Galilee are possible candidates.

Gerard David (c. 1460 – 13 August 1523) was an Early Netherlandish painter and manuscript illuminator known for his brilliant use of color. Only a bare outline of his life survives, although some facts are known. He may have been the Meester gheraet van brugghe who became a master of the Antwerp guild in 1515. He was very successful in his lifetime and probably ran two workshops, in Antwerp and Bruges. Like many painters of his period, his reputation diminished in the 17th century until he was rediscovered in the 19th century.

Cornelis van Cleve – Virgin of the Annunciatio…

Cornelis van Cleve – Virgin of the Annunciation – 

Cornelis van Cleve, Cornelis van Cleef or Cornelis van der Beke, nickname Sotte Cleve (‘Mad Cleve’) (1520 in Antwerp – 1567/1614)[2] was a Flemish Renaissance painter active in Antwerp who is known for his religious compositions and portraits.

Cornelis van Cleve – Nativity – 

Cornelis van Cleve – Nativity – 

Cornelis van Cleve, Cornelis van Cleef or Cornelis van der Beke, nickname Sotte Cleve (‘Mad Cleve’) (1520 in Antwerp – 1567/1614) was a Flemish Renaissance painter active in Antwerp who is known for his religious compositions and portraits. Starting his career in Antwerp in the workshop of his father Joos van Cleve, he later worked for a while in London. When he failed to achieve success in England, he became insane and stopped painting.

Cornelis van Cleve was only active during a fourteen-year period in Antwerp and London. Nevertheless, he was able to leave an extensive body of work as can be deduced from the frequent mention of his works in 16th and 17th-century inventories. Rubens owned two works by the artist. The English King Charles I also owned two works by ‘Sotte Cleve’, which are no longer in the Royal Collection including a ‘Bacchus feast of children being some, one and twenty figures’. Max J. Friedländer identified a group of works originally attributed to an artist given the notname Pseudo-Lombard as works of Cornelis van Cleve. Of the works attributed to both Joos van Cleve and Cornelis van Cleve, the authorship of father or son remains often a matter of dispute.

Cornelis van Cleve painted predominantly religious paintings and to a lesser extent mythological scenes and portraits. Walter Friedländer organised van Cleve’s pictures in chronological order, based on the development in his style. He thus showed that the painter had distanced himself gradually from his father’s style. Initially he was a representative of the tradition in the period dominated by Pieter Coecke van Aelst, Frans Floris and Anthonis Mor, Flemish painters who had studied in Italy or had become influenced by Italian art. He made efforts to keep up with the new style by eagerly looking around for Italian models. This paintings show influences from Raphael, Leonardo da Vinci and Andrea del Sarto.