Category: biblical

Master of the View of Saint Gudula – Resurrection of Jesus – 

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

Master of the View of Saint Gudula – Marriage of Maria and Jozef – 1480-9

The ceremony takes place in front of the south portal of the Onze-Lieve-Vrouw-op-Zavelkerk in Brussels. Joseph and Mary stand on either side of the priest and hold their right hand against his stole. Behind Joseph are the rejected marriage candidates with the sticks that had not blossomed in their hands. There are some women behind Maria. All figures wear contemporary clothing. In the distance on the right a road to a walled city. A square well at the start of the road.

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

Master Of The View Of Ste Gudule – St Catherine of Alexandria with Sts Elizabeth of Hungary and Dorothy – ca. 1480

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

Saint Gudula was born in the pagus of Brabant (in present-day Belgium). According to her 11th-century biography (Vita Gudilae), written by a monk of the abbey of Hautmont between 1048 and 1051, she was the daughter of a duke of Lotharingia called Witger and Amalberga of Maubeuge. She died between 680 and 714.

Her name is connected to several places:

Moorsel (where she lived)
Brussels (where a chapter in her honour was founded in 1047)
Eibingen (where the relic of her skull is conserved).
In Brabant she is usually called Goedele or Goule; (Latin: Gudila, later Gudula, Dutch: Sinte Goedele, French: Sainte Gudule).

Master of the View of Saint Gudula – Jesus before Pontius Pilatus

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

Master of the View of Saint Gudula – Jesus in the garden of Gethsemane – 

Gethsemane (Ancient Greek: Γεθσημανή, romanized: Gethsēmanḗ; Hebrew: גת שמנים‎, romanized: Gat Shmaním; Classical Syriac: ܓܕܣܡܢ‎, romanized: Gaḏ Šmānê, lit. ‘oil press’) was a garden at the foot of the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem where, according to the four Gospels of the New Testament, Jesus underwent the agony in the garden and was arrested the night before his crucifixion. It is a place of great resonance in Christianity. There are several small olive groves in church property, all adjacent to each other and identified with biblical Gethsemane.

The Agony in the Garden of Gethsemane was an event in the life of Jesus from the New Testament, between the Farewell Discourse at the conclusion of the Last Supper and Jesus’ arrest.

According to all four Gospels, immediately after the Last Supper, Jesus took a walk to pray. Each Gospel offers a slightly different account regarding narrative details. The gospels of Matthew and Mark identify this place of prayer as Gethsemane. Jesus was accompanied by three Apostles: Peter, John and James, whom he asked to stay awake and pray. He moved “a stone’s throw away” from them, where he felt overwhelming sadness and anguish, and said “My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass Me by. Nevertheless, let it be as You, not I, would have it.” Then, a little while later, he said, “If this cup cannot pass by, but I must drink it, Your will be done!” (Matthew 26:42; in Latin Vulgate: fiat voluntas tua). He said this prayer thrice, checking on the three apostles between each prayer and finding them asleep. He commented: “The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak”. An angel came from heaven to strengthen him. During his agony as he prayed, “His sweat was, as it were, great drops of blood falling down upon the ground” (Luke 22:44).

At the conclusion of the narrative, Jesus accepts that the hour has come for him to be betrayed.

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

Master of the View of Saint Gudula – Saint Georges and the dragon – 1470-90

The legend of Saint George and the Dragon tells of Saint George (died 303) taming and slaying a dragon that demanded human sacrifices; the saint thereby rescues the princess chosen as the next offering. The narrative was first set in Cappadocia in the earliest sources of the 11th and 12th centuries, but transferred to Libya in the 13th-century Golden Legend.

The narrative has pre-Christian origins (Jason and Medea, Perseus and Andromeda, Typhon, etc.), and is recorded in various saints’ lives prior to its attribution to St. George specifically. It was particularly attributed to Saint Theodore Tiro in the 9th and 10th centuries, and was first transferred to Saint George in the 11th century.

The oldest known record of Saint George slaying a dragon is found in a Georgian text of the 11th century. The legend and iconography spread rapidly through the Byzantine cultural sphere in the 12th century. It reached Western Christian tradition still in the 12th century, via the crusades. The knights of the First Crusade believed that St. George, along with his fellow soldier-saints Demetrius, Maurice and Theodore, had fought alongside them at Antioch and Jerusalem. The legend was popularised in Western tradition in the 13th century based on its Latin versions in the Speculum Historiale and the Golden Legend. At first limited to the courtly setting of Chivalric romance, the legend was popularised in the 13th century and became a favourite literary and pictorial subject in the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance, and it has become an integral part of the Christian traditions relating to Saint George in both Eastern and Western tradition.

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

He was born in Brussels and is known for portraits of prominent church patrons and other religious works. His work is sometimes confused with that of other Antwerp or Brussels painters of his day.

Master of the View of Saint Gudula – Adoration of the Magi – 

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

Master of the View of Saint Gudula –  The Preaching of St Géry – 1475-80

The Master of the View of Saint Gudula (active 1480 – 1499), was an Early Netherlandish painter active in Brussels in the last quarter of the 15th century.

Gaspar Pieter Verbruggen  – Guirlande met Ecce Homo –

Ecce homo (/ˈɛksi ˈhoʊmoʊ/,  “behold the man”) are the Latin words used by Pontius Pilate in the Vulgate translation of the Gospel of John, when he presents a scourged Jesus Christ, bound and crowned with thorns, to a hostile crowd shortly before his Crucifixion. The original New Testament Greek: “ἰδοὺ ὁ ἄνθρωπος”, romanized: “idoù ho ánthropos”, render the most English Bible translations, e.g. Douay-Rheims Bible and King James Version, as “behold the man”. The scene has been widely depicted in Christian art.

Gaspar Peeter Verbruggen the Elder (Antwerp, 1635 – Antwerp, 16 April 1681) was a Flemish painter of flowers and garland paintings.

Gaspar Peeter Verbruggen – Still life of garlands of flowers adorning a carved stone window, a palace garden with David and Bathsheba beyond – 

Bathsheba was the wife of Uriah the Hittite and later of David, according to the Hebrew Bible. She is most known for the biblical narrative in which she was summoned by King David, who had seen her bathing and lusted after her. She was the mother of Solomon, who succeeded David as king, making her the Queen mother.

Bathsheba was the daughter of Eliam (2 Samuel 11:3, Ammiel in 1 Chronicles 3:5). An Eliam is mentioned in 2 Samuel 23:34 as the son of Ahithophel, who is described as the Gilonite. Bathsheba was the wife of Uriah the Hittite.

Jean-Léon Gérôme’s depiction of Bathsheba bathing watched by David.
David’s first interactions with Bathsheba are described in 2 Samuel 11, and are omitted in the Books of Chronicles. David, while walking on the roof of his palace, saw a very beautiful woman bathing. He ordered enquiries and found out that she was Bathsheba, wife of Uriah. He desired her and later made her pregnant.

In an effort to conceal his sin, David summoned Uriah from the army (with whom he was on campaign) in the hope that Uriah would have sex with her and think that the child belonged to him. But Uriah was unwilling to violate the ancient kingdom rule applying to warriors in active service. Rather than go home to his own bed, he preferred to remain with the palace troops.

After repeated efforts to convince Uriah to have sex with Bathsheba the king gave the order to his general, Joab, that Uriah should be placed on the front lines of the battle, where Uriah would be more likely to die. David had Uriah himself carry the message that led to his death. After Uriah had been killed, David married Bathsheba.

Gaspar Peeter Verbruggen the Elder (Antwerp, 1635 – Antwerp, 16 April 1681) was a Flemish painter of flowers and garland paintings.