Category: 18th

Franz van Stampart –  Official Portrait of King Charles III in Barcelona – 

Charles VI (1 October 1685 – 20 October 1740; German: Karl VI., Latin: Carolus VI) succeeded his elder brother, Joseph I, as Holy Roman Emperor, King of Bohemia (as Charles II), King of Hungary and Croatia, Serbia and Archduke of Austria (as Charles III) in 1711. He unsuccessfully claimed the throne of Spain following the death of his relative, Charles II. In 1708, he married Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, by whom he had his four children: Leopold Johann (who died in infancy), Maria Theresa (the last direct Habsburg sovereign), Maria Anna (Governess of the Austrian Netherlands), and Maria Amalia (who also died in infancy).

Four years before the birth of Maria Theresa, faced with his lack of male heirs, Charles provided for a male-line succession failure with the Pragmatic Sanction of 1713. The Emperor favoured his own daughters over those of his elder brother and predecessor, Joseph I, in the succession, ignoring the decree he had signed during the reign of his father, Leopold I. Charles sought the other European powers’ approval. They exacted harsh terms: Britain demanded that Austria abolish its overseas trading company. In total, Great Britain, France, Saxony-Poland, the Dutch Republic, Spain, Venice, States of the Church, Prussia, Russia, Denmark, Savoy-Sardinia, Bavaria, and the Diet of the Holy Roman Empire recognised the sanction. France, Spain, Saxony-Poland, Bavaria and Prussia later reneged. Charles died in 1740, sparking the War of the Austrian Succession, which plagued his successor, Maria Theresa, for eight years.

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings.

Franz van Stampart – Portrait of Philip Sherard, 2nd Earl of Harborough – 

Philip Sherard, 2nd Earl of Harborough (c. 1680 – 20 July 1750), of Whissendine, Rutland, was a British landowner and Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1708 to 1710 and later succeeded to the peerage as Earl of Harborough.

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings.

Frans van Stampart was baptized in the St James Church in Antwerp on 16 January 1675. He was a pupil of the relative obscure Gislein van der Sijpen (or Gielein Peeter van der Sypen) with whom he started his training in 1689.

He became master of the Antwerp Guild of Saint Luke in the guild year 1693-94 and remained active in Antwerp for five more years. He painted portraits in the style of fellow Antwerp artist Pieter Thijs, a leading portrait painter in the Southern Netherlands. These appear to have pleased Emperor Leopold I who called him to Vienna and appointed him his court painter in 1698. In this role he painted portraits of the Emperor, his consort and the princes of the realm.

After the Emperor’s death, he retained his court appointment under the successive emperors Joseph I and Charles VI and to Empress Maria Theresa. He also portrayed many Austrian and German nobles. Van Stampart also was a prolific engraver and collaborated with court painter and engraver Anton Joseph von Prenner on a volume of prints entitled Theatrum artis pictoriae (1728-1733). The two artists collaborated again in 1735 on another volume of prints entitled Prodromus, which represents the Imperial art collection in prints.

He remained active in Vienna where he died in 1750.

Franz Stampart – Portrait of emperor Joseph I – 1805

Joseph I (Joseph Jacob Ignaz Johann Anton Eustachius; 26 July 1678 – 17 April 1711) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1705 until his death in 1711. He was the eldest son of Emperor Leopold I from his third wife, Eleonor Magdalene of Neuburg. Joseph was crowned King of Hungary at the age of nine in 1687 and King in Germany at the age of eleven in 1690. He succeeded to the thrones of Bohemia and the Holy Roman Empire when his father died.

Joseph continued the War of the Spanish Succession, begun by his father against Louis XIV of France, in a fruitless attempt to make his younger brother Charles (later Emperor Charles VI) King of Spain. In the process, however, owing to the victories won by his military commander, Prince Eugene of Savoy, he did succeed in establishing Austrian hegemony over Italy. Joseph also had to contend with a protracted revolt in Hungary, fomented by Louis XIV. Neither conflict was resolved until the Treaty of Utrecht, after his death. He also sanctioned the extermination of Romani people within the Holy Roman Empire.

His motto was Amore et Timore (Latin for “Through Love and Fear”).

During the smallpox epidemic of 1711, which killed Louis, le Grand Dauphin and three siblings of the future Holy Roman Emperor Francis I, Joseph became infected. He died on 17 April in the Hofburg Palace. He had previously promised his wife to stop having affairs, should he survive.

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings

Franz van Stampart – Portrait of King William III of England – 1690s

William III (Dutch: Willem; 4 November 1650 – 8 March 1702), also widely known as William of Orange, was sovereign Prince of Orange from birth, Stadtholder of Holland, Zeeland, Utrecht, Guelders and Overijssel in the Dutch Republic from the 1670s and King of England, Ireland and Scotland from 1689 until his death. Popular histories usually refer to his joint reign with his wife, Queen Mary II, as that of William and Mary. As King of Scotland, he is known as William II. He is sometimes informally known as “King Billy” in Northern Ireland and Scotland, where his victory at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690 is still commemorated by Unionists and Ulster loyalists.

William was the only child of William II, Prince of Orange, who died a week before his birth, and Mary, Princess of Orange, the daughter of King Charles I of England. In 1677, during the reign of his uncle King Charles II of England, he married his cousin Mary, the fifteen-year-old daughter of Charles II’s brother James, Duke of York. A Protestant, William participated in several wars against the powerful Catholic King Louis XIV of France, in coalition with Protestant and Catholic powers in Europe. Many Protestants heralded him as a champion of their faith. In 1685, his Catholic uncle and father-in-law, James, became King of England, Scotland and Ireland. James’s reign was unpopular with the Protestant majority in Britain, who feared a revival of Catholicism. Supported by a group of influential British political and religious leaders, William invaded England in what became known as the Glorious Revolution. In 1688, he landed at the south-western English port of Brixham. Shortly afterwards, James was deposed.

William’s reputation as a staunch Protestant enabled him and his wife to take power. During the early years of his reign, he was occupied abroad with the Nine Years’ War (1688–97). Queen Mary II died in 1694. In 1696, the Jacobites plotted unsuccessfully to assassinate William and return his father-in-law to the throne. William’s lack of children and the death in 1700 of his sister-in-law Anne’s last surviving child Prince William, Duke of Gloucester, threatened the Protestant succession. The danger was averted by placing distant relatives, the Protestant Hanoverians, in line. Upon his death in 1702, the king was succeeded in Britain by Anne and as titular Prince of Orange by his cousin, John William Friso.

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings

Frans van Stampart – Portrait of Bishop Franken-Sierstorpff XI – 

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings

Frans van Stampart – Portrait of a man – 

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings

Franz van Stampart – Portrait of Anton III. Graf von Montfort – ca. 1694

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings

jeannepompadour:

Portrait of Empress Elisabeth Christine by Frans van Stampart, c. 1720

Elisabeth Christine of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (28 August 1691 – 21 December 1750) was Princess of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, Holy Roman Empress, German Queen, Queen of Bohemia and Hungary; and Archduchess of Austria by her marriage to Emperor Charles VI. She was renowned for her delicate beauty and also for being the mother of Empress Maria Theresa. She was the longest serving Holy Roman Empress.

Frans van Stampart (born in Antwerp 12 June 1675 – died 3 April 1750 in Vienna) was a Flemish portrait painter, printmaker and publisher. The artist established a reputation as a portraitist of European rulers, aristocrats and higher clergy. He had an international career, which brought him to the court in Vienna where he worked as court painter of the Imperial court. He is also known as the co-publisher of two publications with reproductions of the Imperial art collection in Vienna for which he also made some of the engravings.

Simon Denis – Selfportrait – ca. 1785

Simon-Joseph-Alexandre-Clément Denis (14 April 1755, in Antwerp – 1 January 1813, in Naples) was a Belgian painter active primarily in Italy.

Denis first studied in his native city of Antwerp, with the landscape and animal painter H.-J. Antonissen. The work of Balthasar Paul Ommeganck also influenced his style.

He moved to Paris in the 1780s, and soon gained the patronage of genre painter and art dealer Jean-Baptiste-Pierre Lebrun , whose support allowed him to move to Rome in 1786. His paintings there attracted favorable attention, and in 1787 he married a local woman. He remained close to the Flemish community in Rome, and in 1789 was elected to head the Foundation St.-Julien-des-Flamands. He also developed ties within the French artistic community; Élisabeth-Louise Vigée-Le Brun stayed with him for some days in 1789 and that same year he and she traveled with François-Guillaume Ménageot to visit Tivoli. François Marius Granet sought his advice when he arrived in Rome in 1802.

In 1803, he was elected to the Accademia di San Luca; in 1806 he settled for good in Naples, becoming court painter to Joseph Bonaparte. Denis died in 1813.

Simon Denis – Study of the Roman Campagna – ca. 1800

Simon-Joseph-Alexandre-Clément Denis (14 April 1755, in Antwerp – 1 January 1813, in Naples) was a Belgian painter active primarily in Italy.